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Recruiting

Kill Your Unicorns

Bigger. Faster. Stronger.

Recruiting is evolving. Fast. Faster than any time in my 15+ years in corporate recruiting. There are many contributing factors: social media, the maturation of employer branding, the prevalence of mobile devices (and their ability to reach a new ‘always on’ generation), advances in HR technology – just to name a few.

These changes in the recruiting marketplace are happening at a pace most corporate recruiting teams struggle to keep up with. It’s created a new crop of consulting firms (like mine) who help them navigate these new waters. There is a lot of opportunity in this new world.

These industry shifts have also spawned a new crop of hyperbolic statements, unicorn statements, about the state of recruiting. Views I feel are beginning to become more and more disconnected with the trench recruiting realities on the ground for most companies. These unicorn views aren’t rooted in the realities most recruiting teams face.

The Resume Is Dead.

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No, it’s not. One of the most popular unicorn statements is that the resume is dead. That in the age of social media the resume is a stagnant relic from recruiting’s past that has outlived it’s utility. There are three glaring flaws with this point of view.

This unicorn statement assumes all the prospects our organizations might hire are active on social media. Not just active, but so active they leave enough breadcrumbs for hiring teams to understand what they do, how well they do it, and ideally whether they’re a cultural fit for good measure. That’s just not reality for the across all industries and the universe of prospects we might hire.

Let’s assume there is enough accessible social data to make an informed decision on all prospect’s suitability (there isn’t). How are companies who hire at scale supposed to manage that approach? 50,000 global hires in a fiscal year? Super, fire up the social media aggregator!

Another point, but certainly not least in sheer sexiness of subject, is compliance.

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Video

“Brand Or Be Branded” [Video]

Last month I had an opportunity to lead a panel discussion on Talent Brand at LinkedIn’s annual conference – Talent Connect. It was a diverse panel with interesting perspectives on the topic. We covered some of the following topics:

  • How to get buy-in and executive support
  • Tools to help you manage your talent brand
  • How to drive talent brand in regulated industries
  • The role of story telling in talent brand
  • What not to do – mistakes and lessons learned

You can check out the full video from the LinkedIn Talent Solutions YouTube channel below.


“Brand or be branded”

You don’t need to be a Fortune 500 company, or the latest start-up, to have a winning and engaging talent brand. These SMB recruiting leaders share the talent brand and content tips that have worked well for them.

Continue your talent acquisition transformation at Talent Connect 365: http://linkd.in/1s8SWeG

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Recruiting

A Case For Reinventing Job Descriptions

I recently had an opportunity to speak at Glassdoor’s inaugural Employer Branding Summit. I made the case that corporate recruiting is still rooted in dated practices, and explored what recruiting might look like if it was built from the ground up today.

One of the points we discussed was job descriptions, and the fact that they’re one of the least evolved tools in our corporate recruiting tool belt.

We’ve stuck to the script for years. Laundry list of vague responsibilities? Check. Unrealistic qualifications? Check. Compliance-driven language? Check. We’re not touching on many things that matter in today’s market. We can do better.

Job descriptions tend to be written for the benefit of the employer, not the employee.

When we write for compliance or legacy, we fail to give prospects a true sense of what our organizations are like – our culture, our teams, our perks, physical office space. We try to convey the soul of our organization in text alone. We’ve become over-reliant on our career sites as the place to share images, video, and our people.

Today’s prospect are busier (and more distracted) than ever. We have a limited window to get their attention, particularly for high-demand talent. A boilerplate JD won’t do it.

What if job descriptions looked more like this?

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Candidates don’t want to rely upon boilerplate JD’s to give them a sense of whether they should explore your jobs. They want to know about things like specific deliverables, success measures, growth plans, and perks. They want to know what their desk might look like, what tools they might use, and what their colleagues are like.

Why don’t we consider things like…

  • Include a 30 second video from the hiring manger about why you might want to work in this role
  • Share stories of past employees in similar roles and their career growth
  • Include LinkedIn/social profiles of the team
  • Embed photos or videos of the office
  • Include infographics and other visual mediums to convey the opportunity
  • Make job descriptions text more dynamic by including hyperlinks to more content (press, awards, employee blogs, multimedia, company social links, etc.)

What are they keys to a great job description in your mind? Do you have any examples of other companies getting job descriptions right? I’d love to hear them. Leave a comment and let’s start taking steps to give prospects something better.

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Employer Branding, Innovation, Recruiting, Social Media, Uncategorized

Glassdoor Summit Preview: You Say You Want A [r]Evolution? #GDSummit

What if?

What if seems like a good starting point when pondering a revolution.

Think about where we are today in recruiting – our practices, our technology, our shortcomings. How’d we get here? Or more importantly, is where we are in recruiting today where we should be? Have our practices kept up with broader societal changes?

In recruiting, evolution = iteration. Our behaviors and approaches change slowly. Our practices are built upon workforce assumptions that aren’t keeping pace with candidate behaviors.

9/10 job seekers say they will use a mobile device in their job search within the next year, yet 90% of Fortune 500 career sites don’t support mobile apply. We’re not keeping pace with these changes in candidate behavior. It’s time for recruiting to evolve.

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What if?

What if…we started over. What if we built recruiting today, based on current job search behaviors and expectations? What would it look like?

I’ll be diving into that topic during the opening presentation during Glassdoor’s first Employer Branding Summit on September 12th. I’ll be joined by an exceptional mix of leading Employer Branding and Recruiting minds to discuss the future of Employer Branding, and its impact on recruiting. You can view the full lineup below. I’ll be the MC for the day, so really looking forward to sharing and learning from everyone. You can too!

Register Here

You can also join the conversation on Twitter at #GDSummit.

Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Agenda

Hop On, Hop Off! Feel free to join a single session, portions of each or the whole Summit. It’s up to you—just make sure you register now for the live stream! You can also follow our live Twitter feed using the hashtag #GDSummit.

9:00 am – 9:15 am Welcome Intro | Robert Hohman – CEO, Glassdoor
9:15 am – 9:45 am Keynote Presentation | Lars Schmidt – Amplify Talent
9:45 am – 10:15 am Simply Irresistible: Are You? | Josh Bersin – Bersin by Deloitte
10:15 am – 10:45 am Break
10:45 am – 11:15 am 3 Secrets to Employer Brand Storytelling | Bryan Chaney – IBM
11:15 am – 11:45 am Content Is King, Distribution Is Queen: Content Marketing for Recruitment | Jennifer Tharp – AT&T
11:45 am – 12:45 pm Networking Lunch
12:45 pm – 1:00 pm New to Glassdoor! | Alison Hadden – Glassdoor
1:00 pm – 1:30 pm If Seuss Was Alive in Two Thousand and Five | Arie Ball and Anthony Scarpino – Sodexo
1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Infinite Possibilities, Limited Budget: Optimizing Your Branding Resources | Jen Powell – Deloitte
2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Getting Your Brand Out of the Box | Stacy Zapar – Zappos
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm Break
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm Using Video to Share Your Company’s Story and Attract Talent | Shannon Smedstad – CEB
3:15 pm – 3:45 pm Bringing It All Together: Combining Your Employer Branding Efforts on Glassdoor | Will Staney – Glassdoor
3:45 pm – 4:00 pm Closing Remarks | Lars Schmidt & Robert Hohman
4:00 pm – 6:00pm Cocktail Reception

 

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Recruiting

Introducing: The Brand Recruiting Twitter List

Social Media continues to change the landscape of recruiting. This is particularly true in corporate recruiting. These tools allow brands to find and engage candidates, create awareness around key hiring initiatives, establish themselves and their culture within relevant communities, and recruit in new ways.

Employment Branding As Strategy

Employment Branding is now a core component to most effective corporate talent strategies. As recruiting continues to evolve, we’ve taken a cue from our Marketing colleagues and found new tools to extend the reach of our organizations – through content marketing, targeted recruitment marketing, brand ambassadors, and community engagement. Organizations that embraced employer branding early and allocated resources are seeing results.

Employment Branding Is Multi-Channel

An effective employer branding campaign is often a multi-channel effort – LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, career site, job descriptions, events, etc. It blends traditional recruiting channels (career site, job descriptions, events) with new digital/social platforms, and it engages employees as well as recruiters. Selecting the appropriate channels for your organization depends on the types of talent you recruit, but I’ve found Twitter to be particularly valuable for recruiting a broad range of roles, particularly in corporate and technology roles.

Brand Recruiting Accounts On Twitter

When I’m training recruiters in employer branding I tend to focus on Twitter, as that’s the platform many are least familiar with. I often get questions about developing a brand recruiting account on Twitter, so compiled a Twitter list of all the corporate/brand recruiting accounts I could find to serve as an education and inspiration tool for those new to the platform, and give experienced recruiters in this space an opportunity to see what their peers are doing (link below).

Brand Recruiting Handles Twitter List

This list will be updated regularly as I become aware of new brand recruiting Twitter handles. If you’re aware of any you don’t see here, leave a comment or tweet me at @ThisIsLars and I’ll add to the list.

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Recruiting

Developing A Winning Talent Brand: LinkedIn Talent Connect Session [Video]

The following video is from the 2013 LinkedIn Talent Connect session, “Developing a Winning Talent Brand as a Small to Medium-Sized Business”. It highlights some of the techniques and methods NPR and Suncor Energy used in developing their talent brands.

You can learn more about what was covered in this session in my #InTalent preview. [Las Vegas, NV, October 2013]

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Recruiting

Recruiting In The Trenches: Should You Care About Social?

The following is a re-post from a guest post I shared on RecruitingBlogs.com this week. You can find the original post here.

This week I’ll be presenting at Recruiting Trends annual conference. My session, Recruiting Lessons From The Trenches: How To Develop, Champion, And Manage Social Media Recruiting Strategies That Work, will explore how recruiting leaders can develop and integrate social recruiting into their workflow, and the impact it has.

NPR Recruiting Manager Infographic

There is a lot of chatter about social recruiting; benefits, costs, ROI. My aim will be to demystify some of that, and provide actionable examples of how to implement social into your branding initiatives.

Social Media is a tool, not a strategy.

With all the buzz around social, it’s easy for recruiting leaders to get caught up in the hype. Don’t. If you feel compelled to get your recruiting efforts on social, just to say you are, it will show – and it won’t be effective. It’s not enough to have a presence on social. You have to actively and regularly nurture your network and build the type of engagement that helps supplement your traditional recruiting methods.

While I do think an employment branding strategy should be integrated into every recruiting strategy, the delivery mechanism doesn’t have to be limited to social media. Your career site, job descriptions (like the example on the right), candidate experience – all of these are tools at your disposal to enhance your talent brand.

Social is a long play endeavor.

If you decide to pursue social, it’s important you’re prepared to put in the time and work needed for it to pay off. Social is not a quick fix solution. It takes roughly a year to build an engaged network that begins producing measurable and consistent results in source of applicants and hires.

At NPR, we’ve built ‘the big three’ (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter) into our top 10 sources of applicants and hires. Twitter, specifically, is our #4 source of hire. It’s been a key resource for helping us reach that elusive ‘passive talent’. This didn’t happen overnight. It took months of engaging, tinkering, and learning to build the kind of engaged community the bears this fruit. You can learn more about NPR’s employer branding journey here. Continue reading

Social Media

How To Be A Digital Influencer

Influence

Influence. It’s a term we hear often in today’s social media/digital/marketing-fueled world. Marketers and brands grapple with – what does it mean? how can it be measured? how can influencers be identified? how can we get them to support our brand?

On an individual level, many of us desire to be influential. That desire certainly precedes social media, but has been magnified with it’s prevalence. We seek out ways to expand our reach and establish ourselves as thought leaders. We long for likes, retweets, and +1’s.

Influence is something that’s earned, not given.

If you’re approaching influence from the standpoint of “how can it benefit me”, chances are you’ll fail. Influence is something you earn through the course of contributing to your respective field – helping others, giving ideas away, and contributing to the collective intellect of your industry. You do this not because you want to be influential. You do it because you want to be better, and you want to help others be better.

Realizing it’s not about you is the first step in becoming influential.

I have been thinking about what a path to influence really looks like, and contributed the following post to Blogging4Jobs. You can read the original post here.

So you want to be an influencer. Whether you follow Technorati for trends on what’s next in digital influence, or your aim is to be ‘discoverable’ as a social media influencer, you’re going to have to put in work to get there. The following 25 steps will get you on your way to being an influencer in your chosen field.

25 Steps To Becoming A Digital Influencer

  1. Be patient. This won’t happen overnight. It will take years of effort and commitment (yes, years).
  2. Don’t obsess over sites likeKloutKred, andPeerIndex. (Seriously, visiting once a day will not help your score).
  3. Be generousShare your knowledge and expertise freely.
  4. Have a great idea? Give it away.
  5. Build Twitter lists of people in your field you admire. Learn from them.
  6. Proactively build a diverse network.
  7. Find blogs of thought leaders in your industry. Comment on them. Share them with your network.
  8. Don’t obsess over your social media follower numbers.
  9. Be a voracious reader of blogs, books, trends, etc in your industry. Share what you find.
  10. Obsess over your social media follower numbers (sigh).
  11. Remember not to obsess over your social media numbers.
  12. Join Twitter chats in your industry.
  13. Find conferences and events to attend. Make a point to meet some of your social media connections who will attend. Have coffee / beers / conversation with them.
  14. Be real. Don’t get so focused on your personal brand you lose the person. Personality counts (unless you’re a jerk).
  15. Don’t be a jerk.
  16. Join LinkedIn Groups in your field and share your wisdom.
  17. Look for any and all opportunities to speak at conferences (virtual counts).
  18. Start a blog (If you’re at least a decent writer, and have ideas to share.Guest bloggingcounts).
  19. Be generous. Share your knowledge and expertise freely (again).
  20. Join Quora. Follow and answer questions in your field of expertise.

Check out 20-25 from the original post on Blogging4Jobs.

Did I leave any off that you feel are important characteristics of a digital influencer? Share in the comments and let me know.