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Employer Branding, Innovation, Recruiting, Social Media, Uncategorized

Glassdoor Summit Preview: You Say You Want A [r]Evolution? #GDSummit

What if?

What if seems like a good starting point when pondering a revolution.

Think about where we are today in recruiting – our practices, our technology, our shortcomings. How’d we get here? Or more importantly, is where we are in recruiting today where we should be? Have our practices kept up with broader societal changes?

In recruiting, evolution = iteration. Our behaviors and approaches change slowly. Our practices are built upon workforce assumptions that aren’t keeping pace with candidate behaviors.

9/10 job seekers say they will use a mobile device in their job search within the next year, yet 90% of Fortune 500 career sites don’t support mobile apply. We’re not keeping pace with these changes in candidate behavior. It’s time for recruiting to evolve.

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What if?

What if…we started over. What if we built recruiting today, based on current job search behaviors and expectations? What would it look like?

I’ll be diving into that topic during the opening presentation during Glassdoor’s first Employer Branding Summit on September 12th. I’ll be joined by an exceptional mix of leading Employer Branding and Recruiting minds to discuss the future of Employer Branding, and its impact on recruiting. You can view the full lineup below. I’ll be the MC for the day, so really looking forward to sharing and learning from everyone. You can too!

Register Here

You can also join the conversation on Twitter at #GDSummit.

Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Agenda

Hop On, Hop Off! Feel free to join a single session, portions of each or the whole Summit. It’s up to you—just make sure you register now for the live stream! You can also follow our live Twitter feed using the hashtag #GDSummit.

9:00 am – 9:15 am Welcome Intro | Robert Hohman – CEO, Glassdoor
9:15 am – 9:45 am Keynote Presentation | Lars Schmidt – Amplify Talent
9:45 am – 10:15 am Simply Irresistible: Are You? | Josh Bersin – Bersin by Deloitte
10:15 am – 10:45 am Break
10:45 am – 11:15 am 3 Secrets to Employer Brand Storytelling | Bryan Chaney – IBM
11:15 am – 11:45 am Content Is King, Distribution Is Queen: Content Marketing for Recruitment | Jennifer Tharp – AT&T
11:45 am – 12:45 pm Networking Lunch
12:45 pm – 1:00 pm New to Glassdoor! | Alison Hadden – Glassdoor
1:00 pm – 1:30 pm If Seuss Was Alive in Two Thousand and Five | Arie Ball and Anthony Scarpino – Sodexo
1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Infinite Possibilities, Limited Budget: Optimizing Your Branding Resources | Jen Powell – Deloitte
2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Getting Your Brand Out of the Box | Stacy Zapar – Zappos
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm Break
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm Using Video to Share Your Company’s Story and Attract Talent | Shannon Smedstad – CEB
3:15 pm – 3:45 pm Bringing It All Together: Combining Your Employer Branding Efforts on Glassdoor | Will Staney – Glassdoor
3:45 pm – 4:00 pm Closing Remarks | Lars Schmidt & Robert Hohman
4:00 pm – 6:00pm Cocktail Reception

 

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Recruiting

Introducing: The Brand Recruiting Twitter List

Social Media continues to change the landscape of recruiting. This is particularly true in corporate recruiting. These tools allow brands to find and engage candidates, create awareness around key hiring initiatives, establish themselves and their culture within relevant communities, and recruit in new ways.

Employment Branding As Strategy

Employment Branding is now a core component to most effective corporate talent strategies. As recruiting continues to evolve, we’ve taken a cue from our Marketing colleagues and found new tools to extend the reach of our organizations – through content marketing, targeted recruitment marketing, brand ambassadors, and community engagement. Organizations that embraced employer branding early and allocated resources are seeing results.

Employment Branding Is Multi-Channel

An effective employer branding campaign is often a multi-channel effort – LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, career site, job descriptions, events, etc. It blends traditional recruiting channels (career site, job descriptions, events) with new digital/social platforms, and it engages employees as well as recruiters. Selecting the appropriate channels for your organization depends on the types of talent you recruit, but I’ve found Twitter to be particularly valuable for recruiting a broad range of roles, particularly in corporate and technology roles.

Brand Recruiting Accounts On Twitter

When I’m training recruiters in employer branding I tend to focus on Twitter, as that’s the platform many are least familiar with. I often get questions about developing a brand recruiting account on Twitter, so compiled a Twitter list of all the corporate/brand recruiting accounts I could find to serve as an education and inspiration tool for those new to the platform, and give experienced recruiters in this space an opportunity to see what their peers are doing (link below).

Brand Recruiting Handles Twitter List

This list will be updated regularly as I become aware of new brand recruiting Twitter handles. If you’re aware of any you don’t see here, leave a comment or tweet me at @ThisIsLars and I’ll add to the list.

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Recruiting

Developing A Winning Talent Brand: LinkedIn Talent Connect Session [Video]

The following video is from the 2013 LinkedIn Talent Connect session, “Developing a Winning Talent Brand as a Small to Medium-Sized Business”. It highlights some of the techniques and methods NPR and Suncor Energy used in developing their talent brands.

You can learn more about what was covered in this session in my #InTalent preview. [Las Vegas, NV, October 2013]

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Recruiting

Recruiting In The Trenches: Should You Care About Social?

The following is a re-post from a guest post I shared on RecruitingBlogs.com this week. You can find the original post here.

This week I’ll be presenting at Recruiting Trends annual conference. My session, Recruiting Lessons From The Trenches: How To Develop, Champion, And Manage Social Media Recruiting Strategies That Work, will explore how recruiting leaders can develop and integrate social recruiting into their workflow, and the impact it has.

NPR Recruiting Manager Infographic

There is a lot of chatter about social recruiting; benefits, costs, ROI. My aim will be to demystify some of that, and provide actionable examples of how to implement social into your branding initiatives.

Social Media is a tool, not a strategy.

With all the buzz around social, it’s easy for recruiting leaders to get caught up in the hype. Don’t. If you feel compelled to get your recruiting efforts on social, just to say you are, it will show – and it won’t be effective. It’s not enough to have a presence on social. You have to actively and regularly nurture your network and build the type of engagement that helps supplement your traditional recruiting methods.

While I do think an employment branding strategy should be integrated into every recruiting strategy, the delivery mechanism doesn’t have to be limited to social media. Your career site, job descriptions (like the example on the right), candidate experience – all of these are tools at your disposal to enhance your talent brand.

Social is a long play endeavor.

If you decide to pursue social, it’s important you’re prepared to put in the time and work needed for it to pay off. Social is not a quick fix solution. It takes roughly a year to build an engaged network that begins producing measurable and consistent results in source of applicants and hires.

At NPR, we’ve built ‘the big three’ (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter) into our top 10 sources of applicants and hires. Twitter, specifically, is our #4 source of hire. It’s been a key resource for helping us reach that elusive ‘passive talent’. This didn’t happen overnight. It took months of engaging, tinkering, and learning to build the kind of engaged community the bears this fruit. You can learn more about NPR’s employer branding journey here. Continue reading

Social Media

How To Be A Digital Influencer

Influence

Influence. It’s a term we hear often in today’s social media/digital/marketing-fueled world. Marketers and brands grapple with – what does it mean? how can it be measured? how can influencers be identified? how can we get them to support our brand?

On an individual level, many of us desire to be influential. That desire certainly precedes social media, but has been magnified with it’s prevalence. We seek out ways to expand our reach and establish ourselves as thought leaders. We long for likes, retweets, and +1’s.

Influence is something that’s earned, not given.

If you’re approaching influence from the standpoint of “how can it benefit me”, chances are you’ll fail. Influence is something you earn through the course of contributing to your respective field – helping others, giving ideas away, and contributing to the collective intellect of your industry. You do this not because you want to be influential. You do it because you want to be better, and you want to help others be better.

Realizing it’s not about you is the first step in becoming influential.

I have been thinking about what a path to influence really looks like, and contributed the following post to Blogging4Jobs. You can read the original post here.

So you want to be an influencer. Whether you follow Technorati for trends on what’s next in digital influence, or your aim is to be ‘discoverable’ as a social media influencer, you’re going to have to put in work to get there. The following 25 steps will get you on your way to being an influencer in your chosen field.

25 Steps To Becoming A Digital Influencer

  1. Be patient. This won’t happen overnight. It will take years of effort and commitment (yes, years).
  2. Don’t obsess over sites likeKloutKred, andPeerIndex. (Seriously, visiting once a day will not help your score).
  3. Be generousShare your knowledge and expertise freely.
  4. Have a great idea? Give it away.
  5. Build Twitter lists of people in your field you admire. Learn from them.
  6. Proactively build a diverse network.
  7. Find blogs of thought leaders in your industry. Comment on them. Share them with your network.
  8. Don’t obsess over your social media follower numbers.
  9. Be a voracious reader of blogs, books, trends, etc in your industry. Share what you find.
  10. Obsess over your social media follower numbers (sigh).
  11. Remember not to obsess over your social media numbers.
  12. Join Twitter chats in your industry.
  13. Find conferences and events to attend. Make a point to meet some of your social media connections who will attend. Have coffee / beers / conversation with them.
  14. Be real. Don’t get so focused on your personal brand you lose the person. Personality counts (unless you’re a jerk).
  15. Don’t be a jerk.
  16. Join LinkedIn Groups in your field and share your wisdom.
  17. Look for any and all opportunities to speak at conferences (virtual counts).
  18. Start a blog (If you’re at least a decent writer, and have ideas to share.Guest bloggingcounts).
  19. Be generous. Share your knowledge and expertise freely (again).
  20. Join Quora. Follow and answer questions in your field of expertise.

Check out 20-25 from the original post on Blogging4Jobs.

Did I leave any off that you feel are important characteristics of a digital influencer? Share in the comments and let me know. 

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Recruiting

12 Digital Tools For Today’s Social Media Recruiter

So, you’re a recruiter who’s embraced social. Good call. Welcome to the world of Recruiting 3.0.

Social recruiting isn’t meant to replace ‘old school’ recruiting methods (for those of us who learned how to recruit with a phone book and land line), but it gives today’s recruiter additional tools to find and engage talent. Recruiting has evolved. Recruitment marketing and employment branding are now key components of a successful talent strategy.

Strong social recruiting strategies allow recruiting teams to amplify their impact, and can be a key differentiator when competing for talent.

If you’re working in a small to medium size business (or non-profit), chances are you’re involved in all aspects of recruiting – from employer branding and talent attraction to sourcing, hiring, and workforce planning. Time is your most precious resource, and efficiency is crucial when managing a busy desk and diverse sets of responsibilities.

As a self-professed HR MacGyver and digital geek, I’m constantly scouring the tech landscape for tools and resources that can help me be more efficient and help my team make a bigger impact. Here are some of the resources I use that have become indispensable tools to help me manage my social recruiting activities.

12 Digital Tools For Today’s Social Media Recruiter

  1. Digg (Free) My new go to RSS reader after Google Reader’s demise. Feedly is another good option, but Digg’s reader was built to mirror Google Reader so the familiarity gives it an edge for me. RSS readers are an important tool for digital recruiters, as they allow you to easily and efficiently view content to share with your social recruiting channels. 
  2. Buffer (Freemium) My go to tool for scheduling social media posts. Buffer allows you to queue and schedule posts to Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+. You can also schedule different send patterns for different sites. It’s a huge time-saver to ensure you’re regularly contributing content to your various social media channels. Bonus: install the chrome extension to easily add to your queue from any website. More on Buffer in this Amplify Tool review.
  3. Sprout Social (Paid) Sprout is one of the few paid social media tools I use. The smart inbox is a huge time-saver, allowing you to view all the feeds you manage (@ mentions, hashtags, etc) in one unified field. Bonus: their iOS app is feature-rich and allows you to monitor, send, and manager on the go.  Continue reading
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Job Search

20 Tweet-Sized Social Media Job Search Tips

jobsearchwebsitesSocial Media has impacted the job search process for a broad range of jobs, and changed the ways organizations and candidates court and connect. These changes have raised new questions:

  • How do I stand out in a crowded job field?
  • How can I use social media to gain a competitive edge in the job market?
  • What the hell is a personal brand?

Recruiters are often asked these questions, and fortunately many of us feel its important to help job seekers find answers. Below are 20 tweet-sized tips from leading career experts, many of which were shared during #NPRTwitterChat (a collaboration between NPR and Twitter’s HR teams aimed at providing job search advice).

If you like a tip, click the (tweet this) link to share on Twitter.

    1. “It doesn’t matter whether you’re looking for a job, recruiters are always looking for you. Be ready.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
    2. “Use SM to network. Reach out to people who are doing the job you aspire to + ask questions.” @TdoubleD (tweet this)
    3. “You can find a job on twitter by helping other people find jobs on Twitter. Good karma and reciprocity are valued.” @lruettimann (tweet this)
    4. “Own your brand. What do your last 20 tweets say about you?” @JMass (tweet this)
    5. “Create lists to show you know your industry–a unique way to stand out and help others.” @SusanLaMotte (tweet this)
    6. “What’s a personal brand? Google yourself.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
    7. “Check Wefollow and Listorious to find and follow thought leaders in your industry.” @Keppie_Careers (tweet this)
    8. “Recruiters and hiring managers can see via your #twitter that in hiring you, they inherit your network 2!” @SHRMSMG (tweet this)
    9. “Share valuable content-the more relevant contributions u make, the more others will want to connect w/u.” @anitra10 (tweet this)
    10. “Consider building a personal web page (eg. about.me). They’re effective, creative supplements to resume.” @dobbins (tweet this)
    11. “At networking events you have to speak up, get out of comfort zone. Listen & Learn. Twitter is same.” @JenniferMcClure (tweet this)
    12. “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. Also important: what the internet knows about you.” @mattcharney (tweet this)
    13. “Authenticity = degree of transparency UR comfortable sharing. Don’t fear UR personality.” @jmass (tweet this)
    14. Here’s a guide for how to use #LinkedIn as a job seeker. http://slidesha.re/17EPgcG Good luck. @lruettimann (tweet this)
    15. “Follow people at target companies on twitter. Linkedin-search types of people that your target company hires.” @clairetapia (tweet this)
    16. “What if you treat each bullet on your resume as a tweet? It’d get some attention+cut thru the clutter.” @nikilustig (tweet this)
    17. “I was told that good jobs come to those who bust their butts and get lucky. You need both.” @skuranda (tweet this)
    18. “Networking: Use SM as a sourcing tool. Then find events where u can translate “names” into relationships.” @lruettimann (tweet this)
    19. “Alumni networks are great avenues, I’m more likely to help out someone who went to my school.” @LindsayClaiborn (tweet this)
    20. “Don’t be a ‘personal brand’, be a person.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
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Random

SXSW Voting – Brand Ambassadors: Risky Business or Pure Genius?

It’s that time of the year again – SXSW voting. This is a three-week period where pundits, experts, thought leaders, ninjas, gurus, aaaaaand other folks with ideas to share (that’s me) pander for your votes. I’m teaming up with Jessica Miller-Merrell (Xceptional HR, Blogging4Jobs), Mark Babbitt (YouTern), and Tim McDonald (Huffington Post) to have a spirited discussion on brand ambassadors.

Here’s my pitch:

Many organizations are exploring the concept, and execution, of brand ambassadors. This is not without risk, and there have been some high-profile missteps of orgs that got it wrong. I’m a firm believer in the strategy if the right organizational foundation is in place. We’re hoping to explore both sides at SXSWi.

You can learn more about the session we pitched below. If you would do me a solid and click the link below to vote for our panel, I would be grateful. If you’re new to SXSW panel picker, you’ll be asked to create a log-in.

Vote Here

Brand Ambassadors: Risky Business or Pure Genius?

In today’s social world, many companies are broadsided by an unflattering pic-gone-viral, a rogue tweet or a cause-driven virtual lynch mob.

There are also organizations riding social media to extreme benefit; their employer branding, recruiting and online reputations have made them far more competitive. How? By leveraging the passion of their employees as brand ambassadors.

These ambassadors enthusiastically serve as champions for their employer’s brand. In the wake of their passion comes employee referrals, customer testimonials and word-of-mouth advocacy far more effective than traditional advertising.

“When we say it about us, it’s marketing. When others say it about us, it’s branding!”

  • This expert panel will discuss employees-as-ambassadors, including: 
  • The cultures that enable brand ambassadors to thrive organically 
  • How to leverage ambassadors in HR, marketing, and employer and product branding 
  • Trend-setters and companies worthy of emulation 
  • The ROI of social ambassadors

Questions Answered

  1. With social media so prevalent and sites like Glassdoor, the candidate experience is more important than ever. How can companies turn job applicants into brand ambassadors?
  2. Employees are the most under-utilized resource companies have when it comes to word-of-mouth marketing and brand advocacy. Why aren’t more companies taking advantage of “employees as ambassadors”?
  3. What elements of company culture combine to create an environment where social brand ambassadors are not only discovered and nurtured, but thrive?
  4. What companies are already doing this well? What makes them more successful than other organizations who have perhaps failed at social ambassadorship (and perhaps social media)?
  5. Every manager, leader and C-level executive wants to know: “What is the ROI of social recruiting”? How is that question best answered? What metrics do we track? How do we account for the intangibles brand ambassadors bring to the table?

See more at: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/vote/25148#sthash.jDTIUe8a.dpuf