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Job Search

20 Tweet-Sized Social Media Job Search Tips

jobsearchwebsitesSocial Media has impacted the job search process for a broad range of jobs, and changed the ways organizations and candidates court and connect. These changes have raised new questions:

  • How do I stand out in a crowded job field?
  • How can I use social media to gain a competitive edge in the job market?
  • What the hell is a personal brand?

Recruiters are often asked these questions, and fortunately many of us feel its important to help job seekers find answers. Below are 20 tweet-sized tips from leading career experts, many of which were shared during #NPRTwitterChat (a collaboration between NPR and Twitter’s HR teams aimed at providing job search advice).

If you like a tip, click the (tweet this) link to share on Twitter.

    1. “It doesn’t matter whether you’re looking for a job, recruiters are always looking for you. Be ready.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
    2. “Use SM to network. Reach out to people who are doing the job you aspire to + ask questions.” @TdoubleD (tweet this)
    3. “You can find a job on twitter by helping other people find jobs on Twitter. Good karma and reciprocity are valued.” @lruettimann (tweet this)
    4. “Own your brand. What do your last 20 tweets say about you?” @JMass (tweet this)
    5. “Create lists to show you know your industry–a unique way to stand out and help others.” @SusanLaMotte (tweet this)
    6. “What’s a personal brand? Google yourself.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
    7. “Check Wefollow and Listorious to find and follow thought leaders in your industry.” @Keppie_Careers (tweet this)
    8. “Recruiters and hiring managers can see via your #twitter that in hiring you, they inherit your network 2!” @SHRMSMG (tweet this)
    9. “Share valuable content-the more relevant contributions u make, the more others will want to connect w/u.” @anitra10 (tweet this)
    10. “Consider building a personal web page (eg. about.me). They’re effective, creative supplements to resume.” @dobbins (tweet this)
    11. “At networking events you have to speak up, get out of comfort zone. Listen & Learn. Twitter is same.” @JenniferMcClure (tweet this)
    12. “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. Also important: what the internet knows about you.” @mattcharney (tweet this)
    13. “Authenticity = degree of transparency UR comfortable sharing. Don’t fear UR personality.” @jmass (tweet this)
    14. Here’s a guide for how to use #LinkedIn as a job seeker. http://slidesha.re/17EPgcG Good luck. @lruettimann (tweet this)
    15. “Follow people at target companies on twitter. Linkedin-search types of people that your target company hires.” @clairetapia (tweet this)
    16. “What if you treat each bullet on your resume as a tweet? It’d get some attention+cut thru the clutter.” @nikilustig (tweet this)
    17. “I was told that good jobs come to those who bust their butts and get lucky. You need both.” @skuranda (tweet this)
    18. “Networking: Use SM as a sourcing tool. Then find events where u can translate “names” into relationships.” @lruettimann (tweet this)
    19. “Alumni networks are great avenues, I’m more likely to help out someone who went to my school.” @LindsayClaiborn (tweet this)
    20. “Don’t be a ‘personal brand’, be a person.” @ThisIsLars (tweet this)
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Job Search

Social Media And Your Job Search – 5 Myths (And Truths) You Should Know

The following is a post I contributed to Careerealism’s Professional Emancipation Project (P.E.P.)

There is a lot of discussion about how, where, and why one must use social media in today’s digital economy. It can be a bit overwhelming for some. The following myths and truths are intended to demystify some of the ways in which you can utilize social media as a job search resource.

Myth: You Must Use Social Media To Find A Job

Truth: Despite what many experts tell you, social media is not an absolute requirement for all jobs and careers. There are many fields where traditional job boards and resumes are still effective tools for finding your next job. Generally speaking, social media tends to be most effective as a job search tool in ‘corporate’ roles and careers where you have a cubicle, desk, or office.

Myth: You Must Build Your Personal Brand

Truth: The term ‘personal branding’ was introduced in 1937. It’s become a common, though somewhat maligned, term in today’s digital economy. Supporters view it as a word of empowerment, taking control of your ‘business of one’ and presenting your self in an orchestrated and deliberate way. Detractors argue the term is contrived, and positioning the individual as a commodity or ‘brand’ is wrong and lacks authenticity.

Perhaps a better term to define the concept is ‘Digital Footprint’. What does this mean? Google yourself. What you find is your digital footprint. It’s the sum of your collective digital presence – social media, blogs, interviews, etc. Putting some thought into how you present and organize these findings helps you cohesively build your digital footprint. You can use tools like Knowem to search domains and social media account for particular names you might want to use for your digital accounts. While by no means required, having similar names for Twitter, LinkedIn, blogs, and so on makes it easier for recruiters and hiring managers to find you.

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Job Search

A Recap Of #NPRTwitterChat

Twitter's Chris Dobbins, NPR's Lars Schmidt, Jennifer McClure and William Tincup discuss the upcoming #NPRTwitterChat event at Twitter HQ. [photo courtesy of Craig Fisher]

Twitter’s Chris Dobbins, NPR’s Lars Schmidt, Jennifer McClure and William Tincup discuss the upcoming #NPRTwitterChat event at Twitter HQ. [photo courtesy of Craig Fisher]

Last week was the debut of #NPRTwitterChat, a collaboration between the HR teams of NPR and Twitter aimed at helping job seekers use social media as a job search tool.

There were over 800 tweets sent throughout the one hour chat. The Storify link below captures some of the highlights. Feel free to share freely with anyone you think could benefit.

Click to view the story “#NPRTwitterChat Recap” on Storify

Thanks to our friends at Twitter’s @JoinTheFlock, especially Janet Vanhuysse (@janetvh), Anitra Collins (@anitra10), and Chris Dobbins (@dobbins) for collaborating on this effort. I also want to thank some of the HR/Recruiting friends who shared their expertise including Laurie Ruettimann (@lruettimann), Alexandra Levit (@alevit), Craig Fisher (@Fishdogs), William Tincup (@williamtincup), Susan LaMotte (@SusanLamotte), Jennifer McClure (@JenniferMcClure), and Curtis Midkiff (@SHRMSMG). Continue reading